Category Archives: with a singular protagonist

At the core of power: choice vs circumstance

Like many chosen ones, Elisa grapples with being special—she doesn’t think she is and she is not even sure that she wants to be. But this book differentiates itself in the deliberateness of Carson’s language and of her narrative. When it is obvious that a writer has taken the time to consider the significance of even the smallest details, a reader can’t help but feel valued and respected. And in this book, it is undeniable that the small thrilling details all add up to an enjoyable and organic whole.

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At the core of power: choice vs circumstance

Like many chosen ones, Elisa grapples with being special—she doesn’t think she is and she is not even sure that she wants to be. But this book differentiates itself in the deliberateness of Carson’s language and of her narrative. When it is obvious that a writer has taken the time to consider the significance of even the smallest details, a reader can’t help but feel valued and respected. And in this book, it is undeniable that the small thrilling details all add up to an enjoyable and organic whole.

‘Nemo, Ang Batang Papel’ teaches us about reality and the need for escape

The National Children’s Book Day blog tour posts the question “What is your favorite local children’s book?” Getting Paged participates with this review of Nemo, Ang Batang Papel (created by Rene O. Villanueva, Haru H. Sabijon, and Adarna House).

‘Nemo, Ang Batang Papel’ teaches us about reality and the need for escape

The National Children’s Book Day blog tour posts the question “What is your favorite local children’s book?” Getting Paged participates with this review of Nemo, Ang Batang Papel (created by Rene O. Villanueva, Haru H. Sabijon, and Adarna House).

Cutely disturbing/ Disturbingly cute, if a bit out-of-focus

In this book, the evil stepmother was more than a trope. She was Charlie’s perfect scapegoat for everything that has been going wrong with his life. She becomes such a source of anger that Charlie starts disengaging from his friends and family. And in this festering anger, Charlie’s nightmares find power to trap him in their world while they break into his.

It’s not dazzlingly original, but it’s a good plot. Unfortunately, the writers decided it wasn’t good enough.

Cutely disturbing/ Disturbingly cute, if a bit out-of-focus

In this book, the evil stepmother was more than a trope. She was Charlie’s perfect scapegoat for everything that has been going wrong with his life. She becomes such a source of anger that Charlie starts disengaging from his friends and family. And in this festering anger, Charlie’s nightmares find power to trap him in their world while they break into his.

It’s not dazzlingly original, but it’s a good plot. Unfortunately, the writers decided it wasn’t good enough.

Conjuring possibilities and magical histories

With a distinctly hopeful—some would say overly and naively idealistic—voice, The Apothecary offers an ambiguous look at the Capitalism vs Communism issue, with good guys and bad guys at either end. When discussed like this, it must all seem particularly yawn-inducing. Thankfully, it isn’t. This story was equally heart-stopping and profound, because even with such a bleak issue at its core, it maintains its balance with bigger-than-life characters. It did not disappoint. Break my heart, it did, in the ways good stories sometimes do. But fall below my expectations, it certainly did not.

Conjuring possibilities and magical histories

With a distinctly hopeful—some would say overly and naively idealistic—voice, The Apothecary offers an ambiguous look at the Capitalism vs Communism issue, with good guys and bad guys at either end. When discussed like this, it must all seem particularly yawn-inducing. Thankfully, it isn’t. This story was equally heart-stopping and profound, because even with such a bleak issue at its core, it maintains its balance with bigger-than-life characters. It did not disappoint. Break my heart, it did, in the ways good stories sometimes do. But fall below my expectations, it certainly did not.

Nothing queer about being gay

I think it’s about time for us Filipino adults to stop the pretense and give our kids the credit they deserve: they are reading and they are ready, maybe even more than us. It wouldn’t hurt to have something like this story, told from the point-of-view of 16-year old Steven who is struggling with the idea that just because he seems to be attracted to male people and likes square-dancing, people might consider him gay. And he is absolutely, positively not gay.

Nothing queer about being gay

I think it’s about time for us Filipino adults to stop the pretense and give our kids the credit they deserve: they are reading and they are ready, maybe even more than us. It wouldn’t hurt to have something like this story, told from the point-of-view of 16-year old Steven who is struggling with the idea that just because he seems to be attracted to male people and likes square-dancing, people might consider him gay. And he is absolutely, positively not gay.

Chalk it up: mysteries and thrills between the Lines

But much like the rest of the book, Joel redeems himself as a bankable lead towards the end of this book, which is where Sanderson decides to release the torrent of excitement and mayhem he had been unnecessarily keeping at bay throughout the story. Primary a mystery novel, where Joel’s assistance is needed to uncover a series of student disappearances, the book (and Joel) spent too much time dwelling and building on the mystery.

Chalk it up: mysteries and thrills between the Lines

But much like the rest of the book, Joel redeems himself as a bankable lead towards the end of this book, which is where Sanderson decides to release the torrent of excitement and mayhem he had been unnecessarily keeping at bay throughout the story. Primary a mystery novel, where Joel’s assistance is needed to uncover a series of student disappearances, the book (and Joel) spent too much time dwelling and building on the mystery.

Prose on cons: a heist of high praises

What more would one ask for in a heist story? All I demand is a believable method of stealing and escape—and given that our thieves here are teens, that’s already a challenge—and this book delivered the goods.

Prose on cons: a heist of high praises

What more would one ask for in a heist story? All I demand is a believable method of stealing and escape—and given that our thieves here are teens, that’s already a challenge—and this book delivered the goods.

Inciting revolution through literature

Filipino readers remain largely under-served in terms of mere access, let alone language or cultural representation. As a nation that seems to keep falling in the trap of forgetfulness, my country needs books similar to this—books that will help us remember. There is power in Octavian’s story, power that draws much from Anderson’s eloquent storytelling and diligent research. There is power in Octavian’s story, because his story is also ours.

Inciting revolution through literature

Filipino readers remain largely under-served in terms of mere access, let alone language or cultural representation. As a nation that seems to keep falling in the trap of forgetfulness, my country needs books similar to this—books that will help us remember. There is power in Octavian’s story, power that draws much from Anderson’s eloquent storytelling and diligent research. There is power in Octavian’s story, because his story is also ours.

More or less, a goldfish in a bowl

Each one an original story, the tales in the book were cute and steeped in lore, the tales highlight the author’s strength in writing short, picture-book type stories—a strength that does not serve her well in this foray into novel-length fiction.

More or less, a goldfish in a bowl

Each one an original story, the tales in the book were cute and steeped in lore, the tales highlight the author’s strength in writing short, picture-book type stories—a strength that does not serve her well in this foray into novel-length fiction.

Min Green, I can’t stop thinking about you.

Making use of the outcast and popular kid archetypes, Why We Broke Up finds a solid foundation in the opposites-attract template and reminds us that clichés only became stale because when they work, THEY WORK.

Min Green, I can’t stop thinking about you.

Making use of the outcast and popular kid archetypes, Why We Broke Up finds a solid foundation in the opposites-attract template and reminds us that clichés only became stale because when they work, THEY WORK.

Seven candles, silver shoes

I, Coriander is basically a fairy tale, complete with your usual cast of lost princess, evil stepmother, wicked witch, and enchanted prince. For good measure though, we also have an abusive preacher, a talking raven, and lots of Puritans.

Seven candles, silver shoes

I, Coriander is basically a fairy tale, complete with your usual cast of lost princess, evil stepmother, wicked witch, and enchanted prince. For good measure though, we also have an abusive preacher, a talking raven, and lots of Puritans.